Buckinghamshire
Romano-British burial mounds close to a picnic site off the A421 between Buckingham & Milton Keynes. Two well-preserved burial mounds lie side-by-side in a field beside the River Twin close to a favoured picnic spot near Thornborough. There is also a Romano-Celtic temple about 110 yards to the south of the nearby medieval bridge at Bourton Grounds.

Buckinghamshire
More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholesbury_Camp
A large and well preserved Iron Age Hill Fort on the northern edge of the village of Cholesbury in Buckinghamshire.

Bedfordshire
More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waulud%27s_Bank
Waulud's Bank is a possible Neolithic henge in Leagrave, Bedfordshire dating from 3,000BC.

Hertfordshire
More information: http://www.enjoystalbans.com/
Full of places of interest to pagans! Once a large Celtic settlement named Verlamion (home to the Catuvellauni Tribe) and then home to the second largest City in Britain during Roman rule (during that time known as Verulamium). Known as Verlamchester to the Mercian Angles (Ango-Saxon's) after the Roman's left and finally becoming St Albans owing to it being the site where St Alban, the first British Martyr, was beheaded. Later becoming a site of pilgrimage and healing, a Benedictine Monastery, nunnery and eventually the stunning Cathedral that we see today. There are some amazing artifacts, ruins and remains to be seen in St Albans outdoors and indoors and the association with healing in this town live on.

Hertfordshire
The village in Hertfordshire where Gerald Gardner established the first Wiccan coven and where they met at the Witches Cottage.

Hertfordshire
More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Hills
The Six Hills are a collection of Roman barrows situated alongside the old Great North Road in Stevenage, Hertfordshire. They form the most complete Roman barrow group in the country. For almost two thousand years, travellers along the Roman road that eventually became the Great North Road have passed these six large mounds. Their origin and purpose has been the subject of much speculation! There are also ancient and unusual species of grass found on and around these hills, which pose further interest.

Hertfordshire
There are several significant earth works in the County including Devil's Dyke, The Slad and Beech Bottom Dyke and Grim's Ditch (on the Hertfordshire/Harrow border). It is believed that these might all be connected to the Celtic Catuvellauni Tribe and represent the largest Iron Age Fort in Britain.

Oxfordshire
More information: http://www.rollrightstones.co.uk/

The Rollright Stones are a complex of megalithic oolitic limestone monuments lying across the border between the counties of Oxfordshire and Warwickshire.

The complex consists of three separate sites: The King's Men, The King Stone and The Whispering Knights (the county border follows the road which separates The King's Men from The King Stone). According to local folklore the stones are the petrified remains of a king and his knights, however, each set of stones has been found to date from a different period. The name is thought to derive from “Hrolla-landriht” meaning the land of Hrolla.

The stretch of time during which three sequences of monuments were erected here bears witness to a continuous tradition of worship on sacred ground, from the fourth to the second millennium BC. A sacred tradition was Christianised: famous archaeologist Arthur Evans reported that one of his informants, a local landowner, met one of his labourers on Good Friday: "where do you think I be going?" the man asked, continuing, "Why I be agoing to the King-stones, for there I shall be on holy ground."

Oxfordshire
More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uffington_White_Horse
The Uffington Horse is a highly stylised prehistoric hill figure, 110 m long (374 feet), formed from deep trenches filled with crushed white chalk. The figure is situated on the upper slopes of White Horse Hill near Uffington in Oxfordshire.

Oxfordshire
More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Hill,_Uffington
Dragon Hill is a natural chalk hill with an artificial flat-top (situated on the scarp slope of White Horse Hill), to which clings the legend that it was on its summit that Saint George slew the dragon. A bare patch of chalk upon which no grass will grow is purported to be where the dragon's blood spilled. It has been suggested as some sort of Iron Age ritual site associated with the nearby hill-figure.

Oxfordshire
More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blowing_Stone
The Blowing Stone is a perforated sarsen stone in a garden at the foot of Blowingstone Hill just south of the Icknield Way (B4507), at Kingston Lisle, near Uffington. The stone is capable of producing a booming sound, when anyone with the required skill blows into one of the perforations in a particular way. . Also, according to legend, a person who is capable of making the blowing stone sound a note which is audible atop Uffington White Horse Hill (where Victorian antiquarians thought King Alfred's troops had camped) will be a future King of England.

Oxfordshire
The Hawk Stone is a neolithic standing stone just north of the hamlet of Dean in Oxfordshire.

The name either derives from its shape, being like a hawk, or is a corruption of the word 'hoar' meaning 'old'. Local tradition has it that a cleft in the top of the stone was made by the chains of witches who were tied to the stone and burnt alive.

Oxfordshire
The parish of Frilford has two significant archaeological sites: a Roman villa, and a cemetery on Frilford Heath that appears to include both Roman and Saxon burials. A further complex of remains, including a Roman shrine and amphitheatre, is often referred to as being in Frilford but lies to the south of the village, just inside the boundary of Marcham parish.

Oxfordshire
Castle Hill and Round Hill, are among the oldest Iron age settlements in Britain. Situated along the River Thames between Abingdon and Wallingford in South Oxfordshire.

Northamptonshire
More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactodurum
Lactodurum was a town in the Roman province of Britannia. Today it is known as Towcester, located in the English county of Northamptonshire. Towcester lays claim to being the oldest town in Northamptonshire and possibly, because of the antiquity of recent Iron Age finds in the town, to be one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in the country. There is evidence that it was settled by humans since the Mesolithic era (middle stone age). There is also evidence of Iron Age burials in the area.